All posts by The Demented Ferrets

Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here. I’m here to tell you all about the “The Demented Ferrets“. As of right now, we have three members. Kreshenne, Ruka and myself (Kernook). So, let me tell you a little bit about what we do Our members: Kernook (Kern for short) – A little bit of everything, and the one who usually deals with the social media/community end of things. Kreshenne (Kresh for short) – Streaming (will branch out later). Ruka – Our official artist (art and blog posts).

FFXIV Gameplay: Part 3

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here. Our misadventure continues over on our Twitch channel, and you should make sure to follow us there if you want watch us play the game live, instead of getting VOD updates after the fact. We play all kinds of games, of course. It’s worth it to check us out if you enjoy gameplay content.

In any case, this is part 3 of it for your enjoyment.

The level grinds and havoc continues as we move forward in story quests. Kresh and I spend our time in the Thanalan region, collecting corpses for burial, befriending goblins, and doing a few required instances.

The beastmen in the area are up to no good again as they prepare to summon a primal. They play a dominant role in this particular section of story quests both as friends and as enemies.

Part 3

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As far as duties are concerned, we enter into Halatali, a level 20 instance. This twisting labyrinthine cavern has been massively nerfed, making it more streamlined and easier to navigate. Completion was decently quick. After that, it’s into The Bowl of Embers to battle Ifrit.

More story line quests and finally collecting our mounts round out the stream, and at the end of the day all’s well that ends well. We didn’t get as much done as we wanted, but that’s what happens when you’re casually playing around and wandering into a bit of trouble, as we certainly did.

The good thing is that with mounts, the grinding will now go a bit faster, thankfully, and we’re looking forward to it.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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Gameplay: Resident Evil 3 Nemesis

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Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here. Today I’m bringing to you another gameplay post. This time we’re diving deep into the realm of survival horror with Resident Evil 3: Nemesis. This particular play-through was done using the PC port of the game that came out on 2000. Although, it should be noted that the original game was released back on the PlayStation back in 1999.

At the start of the game, series mainstay Jill Valentine recounts the events of the first game which was Resident Evil (1996). This was also the first time she appeared as a playable character.

If you haven’t seen the other gameplay and reviews that we’ve covered for the Resident Evil series up to this point, you can find them here: https://dementedferrets.com/resident-evil-gameplay-and-reviews/

Resident Evil 3: Nemesis PC Longplay

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As Jill explains, when the team returned to report what they’d seen at the mansion, the truth wasn’t received well. Due to the grievous mishandling of information, and conspiratorial cover-ups thanks to the jerks at Umbrella, she’s in danger once again. The dangerous T-virus has spread now, and it runs rampant in the heart of the city. Now she must survive the hordes of zombies all over again.

Umbrella wasn’t going to go down without a fight. They had a new master plan. The pharmaceutical company gone wrong unleashes a new bio-weapon they’ve been working on. This one is intelligent and deadly. Releasing it into the city streets, they’ve given this abomination one single mission. To eradicate remaining S.T.A.R.S. team members, and this creature will prove to be Jill’s most dangerous opponent yet.

This is without a doubt my favorite game of the older generation. I cover more about my love for this particular title in my review of it. If you want more information about it, you should check there.

In short, if you’ve played a Resident Evil game from this older era then you know just about what to expect here.

There is one thing I should mention though. I covered this in my review of the game as well, but Resident Evil 3: Nemesis makes the entire Resident Evil lore a bit messy thematically. Some parts take place before the events of Resident Evil 2. Meanwhile, others take place during the events of the second game, and some take place after the events of it.

This makes the game stand as a strange narrative window into almost all of the early Resident Evil plot lines. This game also features branching narratives and choices that will determine the path you take in the game. While this offers gamers a chance to replay the game, you can’t argue that it does make the lore of the wider universe just a little bit confusing from a timeline perspective.

For the average gamer though, this really shouldn’t be too big of an issue, and you’ll likely enjoy the game if you’re already a fan of the franchise.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

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To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Subway Surfers Review

Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here and today we’re going to be discussing Subway Surfers, which happens to be an “endless runner” sort of game. This brightly colored, generally kid-friendly game was co-developed by Kiloo and SYBO Games. These are private companies based out of Denmark.

The game is available on Android, iOS, Kindle, and Windows Phone app providers, and it uses the Unity game engine. The game was released on May 25th of 2012.

As an “endless runner” the game is exactly as it sounds like. You run endlessly collecting items and avoiding obstacles. The perpetual movement adds a layer of challenge. In this game you’ll gather coins, and try to avoid the subway policeman. He’s got a dog too, and that can be a pain in the butt.

Generally speaking the trains, construction barriers and train platforms are the main things that get in your way. You’ll have to dodge around them, or have an item that allows you to traverse the level. There’s a little bit of platforming involved, too.

Loading times are a bit on the slow end. Given the graphics, I can’t say I’m surprised. Since the game is free and it is a mobile game of all things, expect advertisements.

Subway Surfers has aged a bit these days, but it still holds up well enough, I suppose. It still looks great, it feels great, and clearly holds a high ranking in the endless runner game category.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Void Bastards is Plain Stupid Fun

The game is is also very rage-inducing… hey everyone, it’s Kern here. Time to talk about 2019’s pinnacle of assholian game design: Void Bastards.

Be warned this post is riddled with swears, because of course it is…

Here’s the thing. Void Bastards is an absolutely no-shits-given, entirely unrepentant first-person shooter. The developer boasts warnings on their steam page about the fact that the game includes cartoon violence, gore and strong language…

You know what? The game does do that, it does that a lot. Frankly the game is absolutely bombastic at times, and I loved every second of it.

Look, you’re not going to get intelligent satire or thought-provoking, higher-minded concepts. You’re going to get exploding Kittybots and Void Whales that will ruin your day if you have no torpedoes. That’s what you’re going to get. If you don’t like that you can have cameras named Peepers that’ll also make your life hell.

Catch the drift here?

The proof is in the name, Void Bastards is everything it promises itself to be. It’s one bastard of a game, and you’re going to die a lot. If you’re not getting your ass handed to you, you’re either a master at the game, or you’ve lucked out…

The game has a cartoon-like style. It’s almost as if the imagery was ripped right out of a comic book. The game doesn’t take itself too seriously, as other first-person-shooters tend to do. Rather it banks upon a good time and idiocy. When you’re out of torpedoes and the whales have eaten you, that is part of the fun and the rage.

Even the weapon names are downright awesome, but downright idiotic. When you get your hands on the good old clusterflack you can have yourself a good time making a clusterfuck of the enemies.

If you want a flat out stupid, but absolutely fun and bombastic gameplay there are only a few games I can point to. Fewer still come along as ones that I can highly praise. This is one of them. In my personal opinion Void Bastards is good for one thing, and one thing only; being irritatingly fun and not giving a rats ass about anything else.

The developer Blue Manchu really hit it out of the park with this one. It’s a great game all things considered.

A lot of people questioned if the game was actually decently re-playable when the game came out. I think we need to look at the reasons why you’d want to replay the game. To me it’s fairly simple. When I want to turn my brain off and enjoy a truly clean yet goofy aesthetic, I play the game. If you haven’t played it, and you like stupidly fun games, maybe you should.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

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You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Arcade Games: The Simpsons

Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here. Back in 1989, arcades were still fairly popular. Pop-culture media at that time often had arcade games to go along with them. In 1991 this trend still continued with The Simpsons.

Now this isn’t a review of the game. Rather, I’d just like to recall the fond memory of playing it. As a child I went to arcades early and often, so the venue sticks out to me, as do the games that pervade the memories. That being said, The Simpsons Arcade Game was a pretty common “beat ’em up” style of game for its time.

If you were a kid growing up in the 90’s you probably remember this thing. Even if you don’t, you probably saw a cabinet or two in passing. Personally, I couldn’t go anywhere decently populated without seeing at least one. They were in a lot of malls, arcades, children’s play centers, family restaurants and general stores.

Among the stores and malls you’d find them near the entrances or exits, next to the claw machines and mechanical pony rides. At least, if the mall itself didn’t have an arcade, and most malls I went too had a decently sized arcade with games aplenty.

In any case, The Simpsons is a very large pop-culture icon, and in 1990 Bart Simpson, the wayward son of the family quickly became one of the most popular characters on television. You’d be hard pressed not to know of him as a 90’s kid.

So, what’s so interesting about this arcade game then?

Notably, it was produced by Konami, beginning its development in February of 1990 and undergoing location based testing in the Chicago, Illinois area. That’s where one of Konami’s subsidiaries was located at the time.

Clearly, it must have gone fairly well, all things considered. The Simpsons Arcade saw a quick release, hitting arcades in North America on March 4th of 1991 and it was a smash it to be sure. That really shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone. Konami had already reached arcade success with a similar four player style “beat ’em up” known as the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade game.

The Simpsons Arcade matched the general combat style. This time it was with a yellow Simpsons coat of paint this time around. I should also make note that two different cabinet models were produced. One allowed up to two simultaneous players, each able to choose a character, which I don’t actually recall. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a cabinet like that.

The other type of cabinet, and the one that flooded my area, had a dedicated position for the character they played as. Those four person cabinets are the ones I recall playing on and passing by whenever we went out and about as a family.

The Basic Story

Arcade games didn’t typically have deep or compelling narratives back in the early days. They were fodder for quick “game over” screens and the need to stick more coins into the slot. That being said though, the premise here completely fits The Simpsons aesthetic.

The titular and often wayward family strolls through downtown Springfield. Meanwhile, one of the series mainstays, Waylon Smithers. has just stolen a large diamond from a jewelry shop. You see where this is going. After the resulting crash, the diamond goes flying and lands in Maggie’s mouth. Smithers then kidnaps the baby of the family.

The rest of the Simpsons give chase across the city, fighting off hordes of enemies that are presumably hired by Mr. Burns to reach the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. The game takes place over eight stages, and thus, eight boss characters.

Pass through the first seven, then survive stage eight, and you’ll have to fight Smithers first. If you beat him, then go against Mr. Burns. After you defeat Mr. Burns the game ends and everything is just peachy. Although, Homer does end up throwing the diamond away like an idiot.

As for gameplay itself, you get a joystick and buttons to jump and attack. The characters have distinctive attack styles based on tropes within the animated series. For example, Marge uses a vacuum and Lisa uses a jump rope. The characters can also pair off to do combo moves.

If more than one person happens to be playing at once, then teamwork makes things easier. Homer can place Lisa on his shoulders. When he does this, they can strike at two different heights. Honestly, I can and will say this; I played homer most of all.

In my memory his move set is the one that stands out the best for me. My mother rarely played with me, but when she did she tended to play Lisa. That’s why I remember that you could put Lisa on Homer’s shoulders. The more players you have, the easier the game becomes… at least that’s my experience.

Ports Galore and Developer Kerfuffles

The Simpsons Arcade was so widely popular that the game was released for MS-DOS and the beloved Commodore 64 in 1991 as well. Although, it should be noted that both of these releases were adapted by the Hungarian developer Novotrade, not the Japanese developer Konami.

If you think that’s the only release of this game, you’d be wrong. Although, to be fair I wouldn’t blame you if you had no idea about that. Backbone Entertainment released the emulated version for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 in February of 2012. As I understand it, the game was strictly a digital download only. Funny thing about that, I actually missed my chance to get a copy.

Konami was actually to blame for that. You see, they would retake the license very temporarily in 2014. The problem is, when they took the license back the digital versions that sat on both platforms were discontinued.

For those of you purists though, there’s good news. In 2021, Arcade1Up, a retro arcade cabinet distributor announced that it would be releasing a 30th anniversary edition home arcade cabinet which includes both The Simpsons Arcade and The Simpsons Bowling.

Final Thoughts

It stands to reason that The Simpsons would have so many spin-off games and that the arcade venue was where it began in the gaming sphere. I’m sure that it only helped the show gain popularity, and that later games saw their success because of their early establishment in the gaming market.

I wish I had the DOS game these days, but I don’t. To me, this game is a relic from my past as a child. It stands as a benchmark of what gaming used to be like. It wasn’t a social experience based around the internet. It was a gathering of players before and after school, or among family at our local Pizza Hut.

Now, I’m not going to harp about the “good old days” of gaming here, because to me that wasn’t actually the arcade era. To me that was the early 2000’s and the MMORPG era of Final Fantasy XI, before World of Warcraft took the world by storm, but I digress.

All in all, The Simpsons Arcade remains a touch stone. If you go to a few arcades these days you might find an old box or two still lingering around. At least, I hope you will. This game probably should be remembered and lovingly recalled for the countless hours it provided to gamers like myself.

If I had one gripe to make, it’s that those four person cabinets were tightly cramped when four of us played together at one time. There was a lot of accidental elbowing and reflexive shoving to go around. Well, could you blame us? We were all packed together like sardines during boss battles. That’s just what happens when you have four gamers button mashing and wiggling dilapidated, over-used joysticks around.

Trying not to eat dirt is a lot harder than it looks when you’re tunnel visioning the game screen. Hmm, you know, perhaps in that way for some gamers out there, The Simpsons Arcade is a product of a bygone era…

Maybe for some older gamers, arcade games like this one are best left to the dust of fond memories. Never forgotten even if the gamer in question has moved on from it. If so, that’s okay too. Either way, for me I’ll always love it.

The Simpsons Arcade is part of my childhood, and there’s nothing wrong with taking a step back and smiling at nostalgia every now and then.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Loot River Review

Hey guys, it’s time for another review, this time I’m taking a look at Loot River. Coined as a “Souls-like” game with Tetris elements this is one interesting little game.

For starters, Loot River is an action based rogue-like game that was developed by STRAKA.STUDIO. It was also published by STRAKA.STUDIO and SUPERHOT PRESENTS. This game was announced back in 2021 and released on Steam for Microsoft Windows on May 3, 2022.

What you’ll get here is a fusion of puzzle solving and action based gameplay. Loot River kicked me in the behind more than not, and the reason for this is because I found the game to be fairly difficult. The iteration isn’t too bad when you die, thankfully, because whenever you die you’re booted back to the back to square one. If you die, then you’ll have to start all over at the first level. Your desperately collected upgrades will be lost.

The atmosphere casts dark shades and tones throughout the level design. It’s a little gritty, although charming. Generally speaking, the Tetris style comes into play because you have to move the level around to travel through it.

The dark and gritty tones begin literally upon the onset. You’ll play through sections of hovel filled with bloodied discarded waste and what looks to be the remnants of a disaster.

You’ll have to figure your way around these platforms with dark shadowy monsters and this is probably my one gripe about the pixel style art design. Although the world and gameplay flows well and certainly feels dynamic, it can also be difficult to discern what something is.

One might say this adds to the horror tropes just a little. One might also say that the style needs to be this way, and I’d actually agree with that. Loot River has levels that are procedurally generated, so the block-sliding puzzles and deep labyrinth that you traverse are never quite the same way twice.

Occasionally, you’ll come across tiered platforms and traps that almost remind me of Resident Evil when it comes to recalling your best escape route. the moment things go down-hill… and I promise you this; sooner or later things will go down hill. Surprise enemies with ranged abilities will knock your block off, and each moment the screen pans, you should be thinking ahead. It’ll keep you on your toes, I’ll say that much.

Honestly, I wish that I could say that the unusual movement mechanics provided for the gameplay pairs nicely with the combat, but I personally don’t think it does. Maybe it works better for those with quicker reflexes. You can use magic spells to go temporarily invisible, and I’m sure you can dart away from opponents if you’re fast enough. I’m often not fast enough, though.

Personally, I often ended up trying to parry and pray that it worked. Yeah, that’s where the majority of my deaths happened, I won’t lie. Trying to get the timing right takes a bit of learning for sure. Either way, at least it feels good to land a solid blow to your attacker.

Loot River to me isn’t as “souls-like” as so many people make nods to. Yeah, it’s hard, sure… but a lot of rogue-like games are hard. That’s kind of the nature of the game style. Clearly, Loot River has a strong foundation in the rouge-like genre. To me that’s where the comparison fits. That’s the best thing about it, you can play it endlessly and you’ll need to if you want to uncover everything.

Unlocking the upgrades, figuring out the tiny secrets, and piecing together the deeper lore of the story takes time. You’re not going to have it all figured out on the first play through, assuming you even survive that long, which I doubt.

The game isn’t perfect, but it is a lot of fun. You’ll be hard pressed to put it down. Die enough to cheap shots like I did, and you’ll be irritated too, I’m sure. That’s honestly why so many people make references to Loot River being a “souls-like” game.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I’m going to give it a solid three out of five stars. It’s middle of the road, but it does interesting things. I can’t deny it. Loot River gives a breath of fresh air to the pixel style of the rouge-like genre. If that sounds interesting enough for you then give it a try and see for yourself.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Gameplay: Resident Evil 2 (1998)

Hey everyone, it’s Kernook here. The Demented Ferrets are finally coming to you today with gameplay of Resident Evil 2. This is a long play run-through of the Clair A/Leon B story.

Resident Evil 2 takes place about two months after the events at the mansion. The surviving S.T.A.R.S. members have done all they can, but the city can’t be saved. It’s come down with a bit of an infestation, and these buggers mean business. No exterminators are going to get rid of this viral mess.

Zombies have overtaken the city. Most of the residents are doomed to die in this hell, but if you’re lucky you’ll survive. You get to play as one of two characters.

The first is Leon Kennedy, a rookie police officer suffering his first day on the job. Today is just not a good day for him at all. The Second is Claire Redfield, a young woman in search of her older brother, Chris Redfield of the first game. To see the full game, you’ll have to play both of them.

Resident Evil 2 (1998): Clair A/Leon B Story.

Game Review: Resident Evil 2 (1998)

Resident Evil 2 certainly doesn’t hold your hand when it comes to these characters or their personal stories. There are some things you’ll just have to figure out on your own. Occasionally you will have control of two of the side characters, but those moments are carefully planned out.

I’ve done a proper review of the game, so if you want an in depth review, you should really check that out.

As a cursory overview though, if you’ve played a Resident Evil game before, then you know exactly what you’ll find here. There’s puzzle solving and item management galore. You’ll want to conserve ammo since the good bullets and weaponry will always be in short supply.

Zombies run rampant, along with several other monster types. Let’s not forget about our good old friend from hell, “Mr. X” himself.

Honestly, I absolutely love the original Resident Evil 2. It’s not just the horror, it’s the heart. To me that defining factor makes this version of the game the definitive Resident Evil 2 experience. If you call yourself a fan of this series at all, you should play this version at least once.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret:
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Gameplay: Resident Evil (Jill’s Story)

Anyone who knows me knows for a fact that I love the Resident Evil franchise. I think that the games are some of the best that survival horror has to offer.

Today’s long play starts where it all began, Resident Evil for the PlayStation, in 1996. Alpha Team members are headed for the mountains northwest of Raccoon City. With missing Bravo Team members to locate, and a diabolical pharmaceutical company performing twisted experiments, it’s sure to be a nightmare.

This particular long play showcases Jill’s scenario.

Resident Evil (Jill) Long Play

I really do love this game, flaws and all. Let’s be honest, though. There are a lot of flaws with this old title these days, especially now that we have remakes and also a remastering to compare it to. By today’s standards the game is as campy as it is dated. It isn’t exactly ideal, but it is a historical icon in gaming. That’s not something anyone can dispute and for me, that’s reason enough to play it.

Resident Evil Retrospective Review

Hey guys, it’s Kernook here. Let’s enter into the realm of survival horror for a spell, shall we? This will be a retrospective review of Resident Evil. This review will only cover the original black box release of Resident Evil 1, for the PlayStation.

Tank controls and limited ammo supply is the name of the game here. The antiquated graphics leave much to be desired, and don’t even get me started on the voice acting.

Still, there’s an old world sort of charm to the original Resident Evil, and if you’re a fan of the horror medium, it’s worth a look if you haven’t played it already.

I’ve already done a full retrospective review of the game, so go ahead and give it a read if that interests you. There’s also a properly edited video of the script if that’s to your interest instead.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, early fiction chapters and more.

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To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Francis Murphy and Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: None.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Gameplay: The Static Speaks My Name

Hey everyone, it’s Kern here with more Gameplay content. Today I play a very quick little title called The Static Speaks My Name.

The game really isn’t for the faint of heart, the premise is a fair bit dark, really and I wouldn’t suggest you play it if you’re sensitive to themes of capturing people and keeping them in cages, or the downward spiral of a clearly unsound man.

Gameplay: the Static Speaks My Name

Do be warned, this isn’t exactly a game for viewers that dislike the concept of death, particularly self-inflicted death.

Game Review: The Static Speaks My Name

I think “The Static Speaks My Name” is an interesting narrative experience. However, I don’t think most people would “enjoy” playing as as such a disturbed man who eats his pet shrimp and has a nasty little propensity to obsess about a single painting. Honestly, give it a try if you want to take a dive down into that kind of character. If you have no interest in that, then this game is not for you… keep away from it.

There isn’t much to to say about the artistic choices and thematic storytelling here without spoilers. This is a game that gets fairly to the point and lacks a lot of polish. Actually, I’d argue there’s not much to spoil at all in this short little thriller of a game. I’m not quite sure what the deeper point of it was near the end.

It seemed so… lacking and empty in a lot of ways, and in others you can hardly feel anything at all for the character you end up playing as.

If you care for actual spoilers, I’d refer you over to my blog post about the subject. I’ve reviewed the game and you can read all about it there.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer

Gameplay: FFXIV (Part 2)

Hey all, it’s Kern here. Kresh and I have been playing Final Fantasy XIV on our live streams. This is part 2 of our level grinds, joined by our friends for havoc and good time. Lots of laughter in this live stream.

In this particular stream we continue where we last left off. Before the stream, Kresh picked up a tank job and got it to the same level we ended off at. We want to be sure to stay around the same basic exp and level range if we can. From now on Kresh is playing a tank and I’m still playing a healer.

We finally escaped the low level zone of Gridania and the shrouds of forests that surround it… for now at least. We do 3 of the story related dungeons this time around and amass a few levels while we’re at it.

You should subscribe to our twitch so you can watch our streaming content live, but you can find the playlists on our Twitch and our YouTube channels as well.

Kresh and Kern’s brand new disaster through Eorzea: Final Fantasy XIV part 2: A Misadventure Reborn

You’ll want to follow our twitch if you want to see things live when they happen.

After a few story line related missions we entered Sastasha, a level 15 dungeon that keeps the training wheels on more or less. It’s pirate themed. I was massively under geared at the time, since due to the streamlined leveling process I thought I’d hit 20 before we entered and I’d be allowed to equip the gear I’d purchased to prepare for that.

Almost immediately after that, it was time for The Tam-Tara Deepcroft a level 16 dungeon all about a subterranean crypt used as a resting place for rulers and nobles of Eorzea. Outside of a few rusty pulls, it goes fairly well enough.

Once we escaped that, we did more story missions. Before we knew it, were ready for the aptly named quest “Copper Hell” and therefore entered the next instance, Copperbell Mines. This is a level 17 dungeon that has been made much easier since the enemies have been weakened and the developers made the area easier. I still personally hate it though.

All in all, it was a good live stream and we put a nice dent into the three hours we played. We didn’t get to do more gaming over the weekend because Kresh went away on holiday, but once she returns we’ll be back with more misadventures for sure. See you next time.

This has been Kernook of The Demented Ferrets, where stupidity is at its finest and level grinds are par for the course. I’ll see you next time.

Click to Donate

You can help support us through PayPal or Patreon.

Meanwhile, check out some of our other great content below. You can also find more information about supporting us at the bottom of this post.

With your contributions, you make our efforts possible. Thank you for supporting our content. Patreon supporters receive access into our official Discord server, and a few other perks depending on the tier. If you don’t care for Patreon, and don’t care about perks, you can always support us through PayPal too… links below.

Those who join via Patreon get special perks, such as extra content, quicker updates, and more.

Click to Donate

To Our Supporters

Thank you for helping us to enrich our content.

Patreon Supporters:
($3) Little Ferrets: None
($5) Demented Minions: Andrew Wheal.
($7) Fandom Ferret: None
($14) True Blue Ferret: Francis Murphy and Bryan BSB.
($25) Premium Ferret: None.
($50) Round Table Ferret/Fluffy Ferret: Josh Sayer